The Handloaders Bench Home
Home Search search Menu menu Not logged in - Login | Register
The Handloaders Bench > Gun Smithing > Smithing > Filling deeply pitted barrel/parts

Attention: Due to an increase in spammers all new members will be activated manually by an administrator, and start out as probationary members. You will only be able to start a welcome post in the welcome new members forum. You can reply to all other posts. Once you have reached 5 posts you will be a full member and can start topics. We apologize for the inconvenience but spammers are becoming a real problem. We are also experiencing problems with new members receiving activation emails. We are manually activating new members. Please be patient with us. We will activate your membership within 24 hours of registration. We are sorry for any inconvenience this might cause. HB Admin

Filling deeply pitted barrel/parts
 Moderated by: Poacher, DesertMarine
 New Topic   Reply   Printer Friendly 
 Rate Topic 
AuthorPost
 Posted: Mon Feb 7th, 2011 07:12 PM
   PM  Quote  Reply 
1st Post
Jeffersonjbob
Full Member
 

Joined: Tue Jan 26th, 2010
Location:  
Posts: 44
Photo: 
Are you a handloader?: Yes
Favorite type of cartridge to load?: I load everything!
My favorite chambering is:: 7-30 Waters
Status: 
Offline

  back to top

I have a deeply pitted barrel and receiver and am wondering if I could use Devcon to fill the pits.

Would that take blueing?

What do all you pro's recommend for a filler that will blue and blend in to the final finish?

Thanks for your help

Jeff



 Posted: Tue Feb 8th, 2011 12:00 AM
   PM  Quote  Reply 
2nd Post
wheezengeezer
Moderator


Joined: Mon Jul 16th, 2007
Location: Jeddediah Jones Swamp,Corbin, Kansas USA
Posts: 3938
Photo: 
Are you a handloader?: Yes
Favorite type of cartridge to load?: pistol
My favorite chambering is:: 44 Marlin 1.28 straight
Status: 
Offline

  back to top

No filler will blue to match.Not even welding.I suggest a bead blasted finish.



____________________
I was raised in the 50's on jackrabbits and gunpowder.salt and pepper wooda made'em taste better


 Posted: Tue Feb 8th, 2011 01:32 AM
   PM  Quote  Reply 
3rd Post
Gutshot
Full Member
 

Joined: Mon Sep 1st, 2008
Location: Justin, Texas USA
Posts: 172
Photo: 
Are you a handloader?: Yes
Favorite type of cartridge to load?: I load everything!
My favorite chambering is:: 270 Win ...
Status: 
Offline

  back to top

Wheezengeezer,

Have you tried welding? I was always wondering if one could Tig weld the pits on an action with a rod of comparable metal and if it could then be blued?



 Posted: Tue Feb 8th, 2011 07:01 PM
   PM  Quote  Reply 
4th Post
sportclay
Full Member
 

Joined: Tue May 18th, 2010
Location: New York USA
Posts: 171
Photo: [Download]
Are you a handloader?: Yes
Favorite type of cartridge to load?: I load everything!
My favorite chambering is:: 35 DeVries, 300H&H, 7x57, 9.3x74R, 6.5BRM, 8.15x46R, 475#2 NE, 350 ...
Status: 
Offline

  back to top

I had a gunsmith that could fill pits in the chamber of a larger bore shotgun barrels.  A piloted reamer would clean up the chamber and make it look like new.  Inside didn't make any difference.    Some of the alternative finishes might cover the weld.

That said, I just looked at one of my T/C custom barrels and the weld on the lug is blued and it matches the barrel and lug color?  Looks like finding the right welder and a little experiment on scrap stock might answer the question.

 



____________________
http://marines.togetherweserved.com/profile/162502

"Peace" is that brief, glorious moment in history when everybody stands around reloading. (Anon)




 Posted: Wed Feb 9th, 2011 12:41 AM
   PM  Quote  Reply 
5th Post
wheezengeezer
Moderator


Joined: Mon Jul 16th, 2007
Location: Jeddediah Jones Swamp,Corbin, Kansas USA
Posts: 3938
Photo: 
Are you a handloader?: Yes
Favorite type of cartridge to load?: pistol
My favorite chambering is:: 44 Marlin 1.28 straight
Status: 
Offline

  back to top

The alloy will have to be close.How do you know what an action is made of? On a smooth surface with reflective light a difference could be seen the easiest.Myself,a little bit would not bother.Dont get your hopes up on a perfect match.Maybe welding and a new style spray on finish.Cerekote or the like.



____________________
I was raised in the 50's on jackrabbits and gunpowder.salt and pepper wooda made'em taste better


 Posted: Sun Feb 13th, 2011 01:11 PM
   PM  Quote  Reply 
6th Post
Timberwolf
Full Member


Joined: Mon Nov 24th, 2008
Location: Ontario Canada
Posts: 263
Photo: 
Are you a handloader?: Yes
Favorite type of cartridge to load?: I load everything!
My favorite chambering is:: .338LM, 9MM, 40S&W, 38Special, 45ACP
Status: 
Offline

  back to top

The heat from the blueing salts more than likely cause the JB Weld to fall out.

As for welding, the change of getting the right alloy, especially if it's an older gun, will be next to impossible.

As wheezergeezer said, blast and matte blue.



____________________
MFWIC

Nice try = you suck spelled different.

Certified Armourer for Glock, SIG, S&W, Beretta and Remington 870.

Stercus Accidit = Sh*t happens in Latin.


 Posted: Mon Feb 14th, 2011 10:34 AM
   PM  Quote  Reply 
7th Post
Jeffersonjbob
Full Member
 

Joined: Tue Jan 26th, 2010
Location:  
Posts: 44
Photo: 
Are you a handloader?: Yes
Favorite type of cartridge to load?: I load everything!
My favorite chambering is:: 7-30 Waters
Status: 
Offline

  back to top

Thanks
All you guys have given me a ton of info to think about. I tried Devcon on a piece of mild steel and tried blueing theat. As you said--no good.

I think the bead blast and getting all the surface profil similar will be the way to go. I guess after that profile is done, I could sitll blue that or go to traditional brown like the old english shotguns.

thanks again



 Posted: Thu Aug 4th, 2011 12:44 PM
   PM  Quote  Reply 
8th Post
Paul Tummers
Moderator


Joined: Mon Jun 18th, 2007
Location: Berg En Terblijt, Netherlands
Posts: 2485
Photo: [Download]
Are you a handloader?: Yes
Favorite type of cartridge to load?: rifle
My favorite chambering is:: .222 Rem and the .308 Winch.
Status: 
Offline

  back to top

Even if one could manage to use exactly the same material to weld in an oxigen-free environment, you will have differences in heating at those spots which causes a difference in reacting to the bluing medium which will make itself visible as difference of colour.
Even the surrounding metal will be affected by that phenomen; a small spot welded can give a perhaps 2 to 4 times larger area of colour difference.
If one wants to make that barrel look like new, only way will be either the previously suggested bead-treatment or removing all the metal until the pitting is gone and rebluing the barrel and/or affected parts



____________________
There almost always is a way to do things better, more often than not by simplifying.


 Posted: Thu Aug 4th, 2011 01:34 PM
   PM  Quote  Reply 
9th Post
Jeffersonjbob
Full Member
 

Joined: Tue Jan 26th, 2010
Location:  
Posts: 44
Photo: 
Are you a handloader?: Yes
Favorite type of cartridge to load?: I load everything!
My favorite chambering is:: 7-30 Waters
Status: 
Offline

  back to top

Hey Paul

Thanks for your advise.  I have done TIG welding on 4140 but there is just hundreds of pits and I realized all the ttime I would spend just wasn't wort the effore.

You are correct, I had ovelooked the fact that the metalurgy at the weld affected zone would not blue evenly.

I am fileing down to base metal, doing a bunch of sand/polishing then will blue that.

I am posting another thread now about fitting the cylinder stop and timing a HI-Standard double 9 22 revolver.  Please look at that and advise.

thanks Paul



 Posted: Thu Aug 4th, 2011 01:39 PM
   PM  Quote  Reply 
10th Post
Paul Tummers
Moderator


Joined: Mon Jun 18th, 2007
Location: Berg En Terblijt, Netherlands
Posts: 2485
Photo: [Download]
Are you a handloader?: Yes
Favorite type of cartridge to load?: rifle
My favorite chambering is:: .222 Rem and the .308 Winch.
Status: 
Offline

  back to top

Jeffersonjbob wrote:
Hey Paul

Thanks for your advise.  I have done TIG welding on 4140 but there is just hundreds of pits and I realized all the ttime I would spend just wasn't wort the effore.

You are correct, I had ovelooked the fact that the metalurgy at the weld affected zone would not blue evenly.

I am fileing down to base metal, doing a bunch of sand/polishing then will blue that.

I am posting another thread now about fitting the cylinder stop and timing a HI-Standard double 9 22 revolver.  Please look at that and advise.

thanks Paul


Is there a chance, you can have that barrel turned down as far as necessary in a lathe?
I will look at your other post, but have to confess, my little knowledge is restricted to rifles, shotguns and reloading for rifles.



____________________
There almost always is a way to do things better, more often than not by simplifying.


 Posted: Thu Aug 4th, 2011 02:21 PM
   PM  Quote  Reply 
11th Post
Jeffersonjbob
Full Member
 

Joined: Tue Jan 26th, 2010
Location:  
Posts: 44
Photo: 
Are you a handloader?: Yes
Favorite type of cartridge to load?: I load everything!
My favorite chambering is:: 7-30 Waters
Status: 
Offline

  back to top

It is easier for me to file and dress and get this job finished and off my plate. It is a free one (same as the last post about the cylinder stop).  So I just file and work that out.  It is starting to look pretty good and suprisingly round even!

You are right that the idea professional way would be to remove the barrel and turn that, but I just had to move on and work the quickest out.

Thanks Paul



 Posted: Wed Aug 17th, 2011 06:56 PM
   PM  Quote  Reply 
12th Post
TnTom
Full Member


Joined: Sat Oct 24th, 2009
Location: Woodbury, Tennessee USA
Posts: 360
Photo: 
Are you a handloader?: Yes
Favorite type of cartridge to load?: none
My favorite chambering is:: any
Status: 
Offline

  back to top

The proper method is to "draw file" the barrel surface using a bastard file. Its called striking. Draw in one direction the length of the barrel only and rotate "draw" again and rotate. Maintain the file at just less than 90 degrees to the barrel. You will create a series of milled surfaces the length of the barrel.  Continue until all pits are gone Finish with emory cloth starting with a coarser grade and finish with 300 grit then blue as normal. Much easier than turning between centers. Ive done many barrels and all end up looking as good as new. It is the correct way to prepare a pitted barrel for refinishing.
I place the appropriate diameter dowel in a vise on my bench to support one end of the barrel and support the barrel at the other end with an upright 2x4 and with my stool along side put on your favorite tune begin "striking". Takes a few hours depending on the condition of the barrel. If you had one large pit you still need to remove material across all the barrels surface to maintain a uniform condition. Its simply a milling process with a file. Works great. You'll develop a feel for when enough is enough.

Last edited on Wed Aug 17th, 2011 07:06 PM by TnTom



____________________
Don't accept the promise of security as a substitute for freedom.


 Posted: Wed Aug 17th, 2011 07:31 PM
   PM  Quote  Reply 
13th Post
Jeffersonjbob
Full Member
 

Joined: Tue Jan 26th, 2010
Location:  
Posts: 44
Photo: 
Are you a handloader?: Yes
Favorite type of cartridge to load?: I load everything!
My favorite chambering is:: 7-30 Waters
Status: 
Offline

  back to top

Hey thanks Tom.

that makes sense to me and thank you so much for help and professional advice.

I can tell you have done that job a time or 2 and thanks again

jeff



 Posted: Wed Aug 17th, 2011 08:39 PM
   PM  Quote  Reply 
14th Post
TnTom
Full Member


Joined: Sat Oct 24th, 2009
Location: Woodbury, Tennessee USA
Posts: 360
Photo: 
Are you a handloader?: Yes
Favorite type of cartridge to load?: none
My favorite chambering is:: any
Status: 
Offline

  back to top

Jeffersonjbob wrote: Hey thanks Tom.

that makes sense to me and thank you so much for help and professional advice.

I can tell you have done that job a time or 2 and thanks again

jeff

Just another comment when the striking is finished (pits are no longer) and your ready to begin with the emory go cross grain like your buffing your shoes. When the mill lines are gone and your ready for the 300 go the length of the barrel rather than  across the barrel.

Also when striking keep your file card ( a short metal bristled brush used to clean a file) in hand and allow NO metal to remain in the teeth of the file. It must be kept clean to cut clean.

You can do this yourself and save a lot when you send the barrel out for re-blue. Prep is the greater part of the cost of re-bluing. Have at it (find a junk barrel and get a feel for it and you'll do fine)



____________________
Don't accept the promise of security as a substitute for freedom.


 Current time is 07:46 AM
The Handloaders Bench > Gun Smithing > Smithing > Filling deeply pitted barrel/parts
Top




UltraBB 1.17 Copyright © 2007-2008 Data 1 Systems
Page processed in 0.1913 seconds (14% database + 86% PHP). 28 queries executed.