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Is corn good for deer?
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 Posted: Fri Dec 7th, 2007 11:11 PM
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sdb777
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Just as the topic stated.....corn?  Good / bad / otherwise

 

Scott (6% protein is kinda low) B



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 Posted: Mon Dec 10th, 2007 06:20 AM
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Mark V
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It is pretty much candy.  From a nutritional standpoint, not much to offer from deer corn. 



 Posted: Mon Dec 10th, 2007 03:18 PM
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wheezengeezer
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it is good food energy for the winter



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 Posted: Mon Dec 10th, 2007 03:38 PM
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bea175
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Everything i have read about corn in the winter for deer is they can't digest it and shouldn't be feed to them without other types of food . It has very limited benefit for nutrition in the cold months and deer can't survive on it alone. Maybe I'm wrong , I would have to research it more to be 100 % positive I'm right on this subject.:confused: I quess you could ask TX DOC:lol::lol::lol::lol:



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 Posted: Mon Dec 10th, 2007 04:24 PM
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wheezengeezer
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corn in itself is not a complete diet for deer.it does have a lot of fat (energy)in it that they can utilize.



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 Posted: Mon Dec 10th, 2007 08:12 PM
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Not BAD for them, just incomplete nutrition for them. Whitetails will starve on an all corn diet.



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 Posted: Tue Dec 11th, 2007 12:49 AM
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I started adding the rain guard protein pellets that will go through my feeder at home.I try to keep deer feed out all year round in hopes they will stay out of my wifes flowers..But this year I am not home so they may have a field day on her sweet potato and jack bean vines along with her shrubs..Damned deer gotta eat everything..
I have also heard that a solid corn diet is extremely bad as far as nutritional requirements go.But they sure do love corn.One year I tried putting out apples that were going bad..Holy crap,they tore that up around my feeder in the back yard..Apples are like cocaine to em...
oh well,I`ll get em back and recycle her flowers next November...:wink::thumbs:



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 Posted: Thu Apr 14th, 2011 05:52 AM
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sako06
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I'm aware this is an old post but if you can find a copy of Food Habits of North American Wildlife and Birds it's a good one mine was purchased when I was in college getting my BS in Wildlife Mgt Deer love Ceanthus aka blue brush here in northern calif btw it's all over the usa ecept for a zone noth to south about in the middle of the usa,I loaned all of my tech manuals out to my hunting friends in CA so they could locate deer,elk,etc.they found deer bedded & brousing in ceanothus patches.



 Posted: Thu Apr 14th, 2011 10:04 AM
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BEAR
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Yes, corn is good for wild deer. the rumor about it being bad, is spread by game departments to limit poaching, baiting, and deer congregation.

Humans will die if all they eat is steak.

Wild animals don't just sit at a feeder and eat corn, they graze and roam constantly, so there is no reason to think a mono-diet.

In the local corn fields, the deer pull down and eat tons of corn each night. Never say one dead with an ear in its mouth.



 Posted: Thu Apr 14th, 2011 11:51 AM
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Big difference between corn on the stalk in the field, and dried corn from a feeder. Again, not bad for them, but incomplete nutrition.



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 Posted: Thu Apr 14th, 2011 01:09 PM
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wheezengeezer
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The worst I can say about corn is in feeders.Deer that feed and risk passing diseases from saliva.



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 Posted: Thu Apr 14th, 2011 02:38 PM
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Depends on the feeder. The timed feeders in use down this way use a spinner plate to dump corn for a set number of seconds, and it is broadcast out around the feeder. You don't have multiple animals feeded from a trough.



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 Posted: Thu Apr 14th, 2011 02:57 PM
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The feeding at a trogh time comes up, only because more CWD is found in penned deer. No real science in that conclusion.

The reason is probably that penned deer are closely monitored, daily. For every one deer found dead of CWD in the wild, there are probably 10 that are dead and dug into thickets, out of sight (un monitored).



 Posted: Thu Apr 14th, 2011 07:10 PM
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saddlesore
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In eastern Colorado,and  I suspect other states, deer go into the irriagted corn fields when the corn is about knee high.Usually there is water leakage at the pivot well head and they water there.They don't come out until the corn is cut and picked when they are forced out.Then they tend to stay around close to pick up all the missed and spilled corn. So that is all they eat from early June to  late October,sometimes into November.

The only dead ones I have seen with corn in thier bellies are what we have shot.

I'm not one to hunt over baited corn feeders,but these corn fed deer that we shoot out off the river bottoms after they are forced out of the corn can't be beat for eating.



 Posted: Thu Apr 14th, 2011 09:35 PM
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sako06
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Why hasn't anyone mentioned alfalfa cause they eat lots of it also but given a supply of ceanothus they'll eat as much as they can get and it's healthy if one wants to really find out what deer eat do a rumen analysis like I've done it's a smelly mess in a freshly killed deer,remove the rumen,remove the contents wash it then dry it and identify the contents that will answer all of your inquiries about your deer food habits.



 Posted: Fri Apr 15th, 2011 12:29 AM
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Since dairy farmers either buy cracked corn or have a mill to "crack" the corn they feed their cattle so the animals get full value from the corn....if not cracked it will pass right thru (just like when you eat whole kernel corn...check your s%#T and you will see the whole kernel passes thru....maybe deer can't get full benefit from whole kernel corn either....:confused:

not the focus here but I detest the idea of deer "hunting"  (if it can be called that) over a pile of corn or any other bait pile.....just ain't right.....



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 Posted: Fri Apr 15th, 2011 03:27 AM
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http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/10353/1111563-358.stm



 Posted: Fri Apr 15th, 2011 05:32 AM
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sako06
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deer are browsers don't need to be fed they survive very well finding their own food in the wild only time it can become critical is if a blizzard hits covering all food sources creating a high winter die off risk then supplemental feeding may be adviseable but that's a decision to be made by the div of wildlife not individuals!



 Posted: Fri Apr 15th, 2011 11:57 AM
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What's a blizzard? Don't see them down here...



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 Posted: Fri Apr 15th, 2011 12:02 PM
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wheezengeezer
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JEEPOHOLIC wrote: http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/10353/1111563-358.stm


Please don't feed the deer
Sunday, December 19, 2010
By Scott Shalaway

Back in February, I quoted experts from the Pennsylvania Game Commission, the West Virginia Division of Natural Resources, and a veterinarian from the National Wildlife Health Center in Wisconsin who agreed that supplemental feeding is bad deer management.

Most readers I heard from understood, but some mail came from inveterate deer feeders who treat deer more as domestic livestock than wildlife. They clearly considered deer to be "theirs" to be fed, fattened and harvested. But wildlife is owned by the state, by all the citizens of the state.

With winter's early arrival, the "don't feed deer" mantra is worth repeating. The Wildlife Management Institute (http://www.wildlifemanagementinstitute.org), an independent conservation organization that works to improve the professional foundation of wildlife management, explains the consequences of supplemental feeding of deer and other wildlife in a booklet entitled "Feeding Wildlife ... Just Say No!" (2000).

The booklet's salient points include:

• Supplemental feeding changes movements patterns and concentrates deer at feeding stations,

• Concentration of deer increases their susceptibility to contagious diseases and leads to over browsing of nearby native forage plants.

• Products sold as "deer corn" are often considered unfit for human or livestock consumption. It can be tainted by toxins produced by mold.

But when a winter storm blows in, people suddenly want to help deer by feeding them corn. But when it's offered suddenly, corn wreaks havoc on deer digestion. It takes deer two to four weeks of eating a new food source to establish populations of microbes necessary to digest the new food.

This also explains the "corn belt conundrum." Why, many readers asked, do deer thrive from Ohio to Iowa where corn is a primary crop? It is because corn is almost always available there. From young plants in the spring to stubble into the winter, there's usually a supply of corn. So it's not suddenly introduced into the diet. Deer in corn country have digestive systems adapted to corn as a primary food.

So please don't feed deer this winter. Some may starve, and some may fall to disease and predators, but that's how healthy populations stay healthy. Deer may spend time in your backyard or back 40, but they are not your responsibility.

Scott Shalaway is a biologist and author. His other weekly Post-Gazette column, "GETintoNATURE," is published in the GETout section, available only online and in the early Sunday edition sold Saturdays in stores. Shalaway can be reached at http://scottshalaway.googlepages.com and RD 5, Cameron, WV 26033.

Back in February, I quoted experts from the Pennsylvania Game Commission, the West Virginia Division of Natural Resources, and a veterinarian from the National Wildlife Health Center in Wisconsin who agreed that supplemental feeding is bad deer management.

Most readers I heard from understood, but some mail came from inveterate deer feeders who treat deer more as domestic livestock than wildlife. They clearly considered deer to be "theirs" to be fed, fattened and harvested. But wildlife is owned by the state, by all the citizens of the state.

With winter's early arrival, the "don't feed deer" mantra is worth repeating. The Wildlife Management Institute (http://www.wildlifemanagementinstitute.org), an independent conservation organization that works to improve the professional foundation of wildlife management, explains the consequences of supplemental feeding of deer and other wildlife in a booklet entitled "Feeding Wildlife ... Just Say No!" (2000).

The booklet's salient points include:

• Supplemental feeding changes movements patterns and concentrates deer at feeding stations,

• Concentration of deer increases their susceptibility to contagious diseases and leads to over browsing of nearby native forage plants.

• Products sold as "deer corn" are often considered unfit for human or livestock consumption. It can be tainted by toxins produced by mold.

But when a winter storm blows in, people suddenly want to help deer by feeding them corn. But when it's offered suddenly, corn wreaks havoc on deer digestion. It takes deer two to four weeks of eating a new food source to establish populations of microbes necessary to digest the new food.

This also explains the "corn belt conundrum." Why, many readers asked, do deer thrive from Ohio to Iowa where corn is a primary crop? It is because corn is almost always available there. From young plants in the spring to stubble into the winter, there's usually a supply of corn. So it's not suddenly introduced into the diet. Deer in corn country have digestive systems adapted to corn as a primary food.

So please don't feed deer this winter. Some may starve, and some may fall to disease and predators, but that's how healthy populations stay healthy. Deer may spend time in your backyard or back 40, but they are not your responsibility.

Scott Shalaway is a biologist and author. His other weekly Post-Gazette column, "GETintoNATURE," is published in the GETout section, available only online and in the early Sunday edition sold Saturdays in stores. Shalaway can be reached at http://scottshalaway.googlepages.com and RD 5, Cameron, WV 26033.
First published on December 19, 2010 at 12:00 am

Read more: http://www.post-gazette.com/pg/10353/1111563-358.stm#ixzz1JangxTNt



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