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WTB: If you will be going to the shoot in May...

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  • WTB: If you will be going to the shoot in May...

    I am interested in buying a rifle that was either made as, or converted to, a wildcat round. Since I have zero idea of what I am getting in to on these I would prefer to buy one from someone that I know has experience with the firearm. If you are going to the shoot in May and have something you are interested in selling, shoot me a PM and lets talk.
    Friends don't let friends shoot factory ammo.

    Continuous effort - not strength or intelligence - is the key to unlocking our potential.
    -Winston Churchill

  • #2
    Just throwing out an idea for you, in general wildcatting isn't especially difficult but there's some basic techniques to learn. Consider starting with something simple and common like an Ackley Improved round or something based on commonly available brass. You don't want to get into something having to turn rims and do heavy case forming on some whacky unavailable brass that hasn't been around for 50 years. Those are usually more headache than they're worth. Some people get silly with the stuff they come up with. If you stick with the more common wildcats, used dies may be readily available and there's enough information around about them, it really isn't much different than loading for a factory round. The nice thing about being able to load wildcats is you can sometimes find some really good deals firearms that shops can't sell cause there's no ammo available for it. A whole new market opens up for you.

    I'm interested to see what somebody may turn up for you. Wildcatting is a fun aspect to the hobby that not a lot of people delve into. I don't know what you're feelings are on TC Contenders/Encores but they can give you a ton of wildcat options and are easy to jump from one cartridge to another as you learn the ropes of wildcatting with different cartridges.

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    • #3
      I appreciate the consideration. In some ways I think the more rare, the more interesting. I can have dies milled out if needed, but ideally if it is that odd then maybe I can cut a deal that includes the dies.

      Years ago it was pretty easy to buy used stuff. Now that sites that had individuals selling local don't allow firearm listings so it is pretty hard. Shops out here are stupid expensive on used firearms. I have purchased new for $50 more than a used model that was probably no more than 10 years old. And pistols - they think that firing them adds value. Same for used reloading equipment. I also can't get myself to trust a lot of the stuff on see on the used racks. People just don't take care of stuff.
      Friends don't let friends shoot factory ammo.

      Continuous effort - not strength or intelligence - is the key to unlocking our potential.
      -Winston Churchill

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      • #4
        Working with wildcats can be very rewarding, very challenging, and sometimes downright frustrating. Some wildcats are now more or less standard including many of the Ackley cartridges. Some wildcats like the 7-30 waters are as simple as running a 30-30 case into a 7-30 die and forming a new shoulder, the reloading the reformed case and firing it to form the 7-30 brass. A little case trimming and an anneal and you are good to go.

        Some, like the Gibbs cartridges, involve expanding the neck to a larger diameter, then reforming a false shoulder on the wider neck, loading and fireforming. Or necking to the desired caliber and seating the bullet into the lands to control headspace and firing. You can take any 30-06 length chamber and ream the body to a straighter wall and moving the shoulder forward significantly.

        Then there are the wildcats that have a 3 or 4 die reforming set that takes cartridge necks down in steps and sets shoulders back. These might require multiple annealing, case neck turning, foreforming, Reducing rim diameter or thickness, etc. These may often be to feed a vintage rifle with brass no longer available as well as to make brass for a newly chambered invention of your own making. These take a bit more work. RD
        Every once in a while in life we need a policeman, a lawyer, a doctor and a preacher. We need a farmer three times a day, every day.

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        • #5
          Many, many standard cartridges today began as wildcats. Wildcat can be a very broad definition. Cartridges that began as wildcats include the 22/250, 257 Robert, 338/06, 35 Whelen, and many, many more. Those four are just ones I happen to have and load for.
          Last edited by Charley; 2 weeks ago.
          "The fact that guns can kill another human being is the whole point. That\'s why they are so darn good at deterring violent criminals". Ann Coulter

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          • #6
            Heck I’d probably show up to that thing if someone brought out a 99 Savage in .219 Donaldson Wasp, with all the forming dies of course.
            Endeavor to persevere.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by deaddog View Post
              Heck I’d probably show up to that thing if someone brought out a 99 Savage in .219 Donaldson Wasp, with all the forming dies of course.
              You'd buy a tomato stake?

              Every once in a while in life we need a policeman, a lawyer, a doctor and a preacher. We need a farmer three times a day, every day.

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