Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

WTB: If you will be going to the shoot in May...

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • WTB: If you will be going to the shoot in May...

    I am interested in buying a rifle that was either made as, or converted to, a wildcat round. Since I have zero idea of what I am getting in to on these I would prefer to buy one from someone that I know has experience with the firearm. If you are going to the shoot in May and have something you are interested in selling, shoot me a PM and lets talk.
    Friends don't let friends shoot factory ammo.

    Continuous effort - not strength or intelligence - is the key to unlocking our potential.
    -Winston Churchill

  • #2
    Just throwing out an idea for you, in general wildcatting isn't especially difficult but there's some basic techniques to learn. Consider starting with something simple and common like an Ackley Improved round or something based on commonly available brass. You don't want to get into something having to turn rims and do heavy case forming on some whacky unavailable brass that hasn't been around for 50 years. Those are usually more headache than they're worth. Some people get silly with the stuff they come up with. If you stick with the more common wildcats, used dies may be readily available and there's enough information around about them, it really isn't much different than loading for a factory round. The nice thing about being able to load wildcats is you can sometimes find some really good deals firearms that shops can't sell cause there's no ammo available for it. A whole new market opens up for you.

    I'm interested to see what somebody may turn up for you. Wildcatting is a fun aspect to the hobby that not a lot of people delve into. I don't know what you're feelings are on TC Contenders/Encores but they can give you a ton of wildcat options and are easy to jump from one cartridge to another as you learn the ropes of wildcatting with different cartridges.

    Comment


    • #3
      I appreciate the consideration. In some ways I think the more rare, the more interesting. I can have dies milled out if needed, but ideally if it is that odd then maybe I can cut a deal that includes the dies.

      Years ago it was pretty easy to buy used stuff. Now that sites that had individuals selling local don't allow firearm listings so it is pretty hard. Shops out here are stupid expensive on used firearms. I have purchased new for $50 more than a used model that was probably no more than 10 years old. And pistols - they think that firing them adds value. Same for used reloading equipment. I also can't get myself to trust a lot of the stuff on see on the used racks. People just don't take care of stuff.
      Friends don't let friends shoot factory ammo.

      Continuous effort - not strength or intelligence - is the key to unlocking our potential.
      -Winston Churchill

      Comment


      • #4
        Working with wildcats can be very rewarding, very challenging, and sometimes downright frustrating. Some wildcats are now more or less standard including many of the Ackley cartridges. Some wildcats like the 7-30 waters are as simple as running a 30-30 case into a 7-30 die and forming a new shoulder, the reloading the reformed case and firing it to form the 7-30 brass. A little case trimming and an anneal and you are good to go.

        Some, like the Gibbs cartridges, involve expanding the neck to a larger diameter, then reforming a false shoulder on the wider neck, loading and fireforming. Or necking to the desired caliber and seating the bullet into the lands to control headspace and firing. You can take any 30-06 length chamber and ream the body to a straighter wall and moving the shoulder forward significantly.

        Then there are the wildcats that have a 3 or 4 die reforming set that takes cartridge necks down in steps and sets shoulders back. These might require multiple annealing, case neck turning, foreforming, Reducing rim diameter or thickness, etc. These may often be to feed a vintage rifle with brass no longer available as well as to make brass for a newly chambered invention of your own making. These take a bit more work. RD
        Every once in a while in life we need a policeman, a lawyer, a doctor and a preacher. We need a farmer three times a day, every day.

        Et Canis Manducare Canis Mundi

        Comment


        • #5
          Many, many standard cartridges today began as wildcats. Wildcat can be a very broad definition. Cartridges that began as wildcats include the 22/250, 257 Robert, 338/06, 35 Whelen, and many, many more. Those four are just ones I happen to have and load for.
          Last edited by Charley; 01-03-2019, 08:44.
          "The fact that guns can kill another human being is the whole point. That\'s why they are so darn good at deterring violent criminals". Ann Coulter

          Comment


          • #6
            Heck I’d probably show up to that thing if someone brought out a 99 Savage in .219 Donaldson Wasp, with all the forming dies of course.
            Endeavor to persevere.

            Call sign: Limp Wrist

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by deaddog View Post
              Heck I’d probably show up to that thing if someone brought out a 99 Savage in .219 Donaldson Wasp, with all the forming dies of course.
              You'd buy a tomato stake?

              Every once in a while in life we need a policeman, a lawyer, a doctor and a preacher. We need a farmer three times a day, every day.

              Et Canis Manducare Canis Mundi

              Comment


              • #8
                Shhhh. Don't tell anyone.
                Heirloom stakes are the cornerstone of any well rounded garden.
                Endeavor to persevere.

                Call sign: Limp Wrist

                Comment


                • #9
                  I assume you are familiar with these.
                  Click image for larger version

Name:	heirloom2.jpg
Views:	60
Size:	51.4 KB
ID:	830715
                  Last edited by Rockydog; 01-24-2019, 19:27.
                  Every once in a while in life we need a policeman, a lawyer, a doctor and a preacher. We need a farmer three times a day, every day.

                  Et Canis Manducare Canis Mundi

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Talk about changing the subject of a forum. That is ok, I might learn something since I have no patience for growing tomatoes.
                    "The United States Marine Corps is a drug and I am a recovering addict."

                    "American by birthright… U.S. MARINE by the Grace of GOD!"

                    "And on the 8th day God created Marines and like fish, we came from the sea!"

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I am just happy the thread is alive - still no takers.
                      Friends don't let friends shoot factory ammo.

                      Continuous effort - not strength or intelligence - is the key to unlocking our potential.
                      -Winston Churchill

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        golong, Why not just make your own? For example buy a Remington 700 or Savage 110 in a base caliber you like. For example .270 Winchester. Shoot a few rounds down the bore to confirm accuracy. Rent, or find a gunsmith who has, a wildcat reamer set. .270 Gibbs would work. Have the smith ream and headspace to .270 Gibbs. Buy a set of Gibbs dies and you are in business. Learning to fireform the brass is a piece of cake. My 6.5 Gibbs gets right up there within 100-150 fps of a .264 win mag. You can find Gibbs reamers in 6mm (.243), .25, 6.5 mm (.264), .270, 7mm (.280), .30, and 8mm. All 30-06 case based.

                        You can even build them on a Mauser action and barrel in 8mm or an Arisaka Action in 6.5mm. Mine is on the 6.5 and the original barrel. Has shot prairie dogs at a measured 440 yards with about 25% kill rate.

                        You can also pick up TC Contender barrels in 6TCU, 6.5TCU, and 7TCU for less than $250. Dies are readily available. Made from .223 brass. You'll need an action and stock but you should get into the whole kit and kaboodle for under $600 barrel. action stock and dies included.

                        A TC Contender or Encore with a 7-30 Waters barrel is cheap fun too. About the same investment as the TCUs but it's a 7mm based on a 30-30 case with a blown out case with the shoulder moved forward. Cases are easily formed. You can get factory ammo for this one but it's pretty easy and far cheaper to make your own.

                        No neck turning needed on any of these cartridges
                        Every once in a while in life we need a policeman, a lawyer, a doctor and a preacher. We need a farmer three times a day, every day.

                        Et Canis Manducare Canis Mundi

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Thanks RD. I will give that some thought.
                          Friends don't let friends shoot factory ammo.

                          Continuous effort - not strength or intelligence - is the key to unlocking our potential.
                          -Winston Churchill

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Rockydog What is the parent case for the 25Gibbs?
                            It's not that Democrats are so damned ignorant. Their problem is that everything they know is wrong.

                            Wimachtendienk, Wingolauchsik, Witahemui

                            He who knows not and knows not that he knows not, is a fool.
                            He who knows not and knows he knows not, is wise.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by olyeller View Post
                              Rockydog What is the parent case for the 25Gibbs?
                              30-06, as are all the Gibbs cartridges. Reamers are all designed for no turn necks regardless of caliber. From left:
                              .35 Whelen AI., 30-06, 30-06 AI., 30 Gibbs, 270 Gibbs, 6.5 Gibbs 160 Gr.RN, 6.5Gibbs 140 Gr., 25-06 AI., 25 Gibbs, .240 Gibbs.
                              ​​​​​​
                              Click image for larger version  Name:	021.JPG Views:	0 Size:	45.5 KB ID:	830826
                              Last edited by Rockydog; 01-25-2019, 21:10.
                              Every once in a while in life we need a policeman, a lawyer, a doctor and a preacher. We need a farmer three times a day, every day.

                              Et Canis Manducare Canis Mundi

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X