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  • Elk Hoof Disease

    Here's a link to an article about Elk Hoof Disease now found in Washington's Blue Mountain Range. This disease evidently infects and destroys the elk's hoof structures causing extreme lameness that restricts the elk's ability to forage and move freely. Photos included in the article look really nasty. Not good news by any stretch. RD
    https://www.foxnews.com/lifestyle/wa...blue-mountains
    Every once in a while in life we need a policeman, a lawyer, a doctor and a preacher. We need a farmer three times a day, every day.

    Et Canis Manducare Canis Mundi

  • #2
    Sounds like what we call “Foot rot” in cattle.
    Not as Lean, Not as Mean, but still a Marine!

    If there must be trouble, let it be in my day, that my child may have peace. -- Thomas Paine

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    • #3
      Snuffy, I was thinking the same thing. We also have "Hairy Warts" that grow between cow's toes. Very painful and difficult to treat.
      Every once in a while in life we need a policeman, a lawyer, a doctor and a preacher. We need a farmer three times a day, every day.

      Et Canis Manducare Canis Mundi

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      • #4
        Been a very wet, mild winter here. Cattle have been standing in mud all winter long. I’m sure as soon as it starts to warm up and the humidity increases we will see a lot of foot rot going around, since aureomycine is no longer available. If caught early, the best treatment we have found is 10 cc’s of Micotil and usually see a big improvement by the next day.
        Not as Lean, Not as Mean, but still a Marine!

        If there must be trouble, let it be in my day, that my child may have peace. -- Thomas Paine

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        • #5
          https://wdfw.wa.gov/conservation/health/hoof_disease/

          Elk hoof disease in Washington State

          Since 2008, reports of elk with deformed, broken, or missing hooves have increased dramatically in southwest Washington, with sporadic observations in other areas west of the Cascade Range. While elk are susceptible to many conditions that result in limping or hoof deformities, the prevalence and severity of this new affliction – now known as treponeme-associated hoof disease (TAHD) – suggested something altogether different.

          Diagnostic research conducted by the Washington Department of Fish and Wildlife (WDFW) in conjunction with a panel of scientific advisors found that these abnormalities were strongly associated with treponeme bacteria, known to cause digital dermatitis in cattle, sheep and goats. Although this type of disease has plagued the dairy industry for decades, TAHD had never before been documented in elk or any other hooved wildlife species.

          Since then, WDFW has continued to work with scientists, veterinarians, outdoor organizations, tribal governments and others through its Hoof Disease Technical Advisory Group and Public Working Group to develop management strategies for elk infected by TAHD.

          Several aspects of TAHD in elk are clear:
          • Susceptibility: The disease appears to be highly infectious among elk, but there is no evidence that it affects humans. TAHD can affect any hoof in any elk, young or old, male or female.
          • Hooves only: Tests show the disease is limited to animals' hooves, and does not affect their meat or organs. If the meat looks normal and if hunters harvest, process and cook it practicing good hygiene, it is probably safe to eat.
          • No treatment: Currently, there is no vaccine to prevent the disease, nor are there any proven options for treating it in the field. Similar diseases in livestock are treated by forcing them to walk through foot baths and cleaning and bandaging their hooves, but that is not a feasible option for free-ranging elk.
          Counties with confirmed cases of TAHD

          To date, WDFW has confirmed cases of elk afflicted with TAHD in Clark, Cowlitz, Grays Harbor, King, Klickitat, Lewis, Mason, Pacific, Pierce, Skagit, Skamania, Thurston, Wahkiakum, and Whatcom counties. Preliminary efforts to formally estimate the prevalence and distribution of TAHD indicate the disease is most prevalent in Cowlitz, Wahkiakum, and the western half of Lewis county.

          Since 2015, the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife has also confirmed TAHD in elk populations in both western and eastern Oregon.

          How hunters and others can help

          State wildlife managers are asking for the public's help to monitor and prevent the spread of TAHD in several ways:
          • Leave hooves: Scientists believe that treponeme bacteria may persist in moist soil and spread to new areas on the hooves of infected elk. For that reason, WDFW requires hunters to remove the hooves of any elk taken in affected areas and leave them onsite. During the 2018-19 hunting season, this rule applies to GMUs 407, 418, 437, 454, 501-578, 633, 636 and 642-699.
          • Report elk: Hunters can help WDFW track TAHD by reporting observations of healthy or limping elk as well as dead elk with hoof deformities using the reporting tools on this page.
          • Clean shoes and tires: Anyone who hikes or drives off-road in a known affected area can help minimize the risk of spreading the disease to new areas by removing all mud from their shoes or tires before leaving the area.
          Salt&Light

          WOODSMAN777

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          • #6
            I thought that was only an issue in Southwest Washington? Sad to see it on the east side as well. I've taken several elk in Washington, never had one with hoof rot, however I've see them with it pretty bad down by Ryderwood.

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