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  • Loading for the 9mm

    Well, I have a ton of once fired 9mm pickup brass, and though I sold what I thought would be my last 9mm pistol a few years back, it made sense that the availability of brass, free brass, would justify such an acquisition. After all, I could keep shooting costs down by reloading, right?

    So, looking through the pre-owned 9mm's at a local shop, I spotted a mint condition S&W Shield, with box, manual, and extra magazine, for $279. Same gun new was $579, so I took out my wallet.

    Of course, the owner of the LGS offered to discount a couple boxes of ammo by 10%, so I picked up a box of Speer Brass Blazer 115gr RN and headed out the door.

    Now, (the point being), when I hit Midway and Midsouth for bullets, I have everything else, I found that I couldn't actually beat the price of Blazer, Fiocchi, or Magtec even with cast bullets ! It always make sense to be prepared to assemble your own loads, but those that pitch the brass at the range, with no intention of ever loading their own, have a valid point when it comes to 9mm.

    Who'd a thought?
    Experience is what you get, when you don\'t get what you want ;-)

  • #2
    Check these people out. They actually make lots of great quality bullets in house as well as sourced elsewhere. The more you buy the cheaper the price AND SHIPPING IS ALWAYS INCLUDED IN PRICE. I have found that even when places like Midway ( a great company) have things on sale, they hammer you with shipping costs. This company out in Idaho is a good one and if you email them they will get right back to you too, which is spotty elsewhere.
    https://www.rmrbullets.com/product-c.../rmr-in-house/

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    • #3
      <p>Smith & Wesson’s new M&P SHIELD™ is a slim, concealable, lightweight, striker-fired polymer pistol.  Available in 9mm, the new M&P SHIELD features a slim design combined with the proven and trusted features found in the M&a
      Endeavor to persevere.

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      • #4
        Not sure how you came up with that.

        If you're only buying/pricing bullets and primers by the hundreds and not thousands I can see it costing more than factory. I mean I pay about $8.50 for a box of factory 9mm, I pay about 6 dollars for 50 of my reloads.

        I mean it really is only saving about $5/hundred rounds.
        Last edited by Lizardkinged; 2 weeks ago.

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        • #5
          Not many years ago there was no shortage of cheap comblpck milsurp ammo.
          Why handload it?

          That went away and people are having to learn this hobby to shoot their toks, maks, nagants, rifles, and many more.

          I can guarantee that even .223R and 9x19mm will not get cheaper down the road.
          Last edited by Damannoyed; 2 weeks ago. Reason: why.....

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          • #6
            Loading 9mm and .223 Rem for the price is something that can be hard to justify especially if you factor in your time. For me it is a hobby, and a hobby is something that you typically spend money on. I don't always try to keep my 9mm or 40 S&W brass since picking it up can be a hassle. I always try to grab whatever 45 ACP and .223 brass that I can see, but I don't hunt for all of it. If it is hiding then it did not intend on coming home.

            Having said all that, worst case the cost of my loads are on-par with discount rounds and they always shoot better. If you choose to buy ammo I would stay away from Fiocchi. It sucks so bad that I only bring it out when my sons friends come shoot. I would rather them waste that ammo and give me the brass to take home.
            Friends don't let friends shoot factory ammo.

            Continuous effort - not strength or intelligence - is the key to unlocking our potential.
            -Winston Churchill

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            • #7
              The Shield is a great pistol as long as your hands are in good shape. The slide is a B---h to rack if arthritis isn't around. My wife bought one but even with the handi-racker the slide was just to much. Traded my son for his EZ and everyone is happy. As far as reloads with the inexpensive reloads out there I figure I save less than $30 per K. The range I use doesn't allow cast bullets. I'm retired so time isn't a factor but if I was still working I wouldn't spend my time reloading 9mm and 223's.
              Never drink down stream from the herd.

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              • #8
                A lot of compacts are hard rackers.

                between simply less slide to grab and stronger springs to balance less slide mass against the same power, they can be real hard.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Lizardkinged View Post
                  Not sure how you came up with that..
                  Ha, you're right, about half that, I'm back to loading my own again :-)

                  Originally posted by Damannoyed View Post
                  A lot of compacts are hard rackers..
                  I had a Springfield Compact for several years. I never worried about my wife and daughters accidently working the slide and having an accident.
                  Between the light weight and needing enough spring to keep the gun from falling apart, the Shield takes some effort to get it to go.

                  I still like it anyway.
                  Experience is what you get, when you don\'t get what you want ;-)

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                  • #10
                    You can get jacketed bullets from Precision Delta for almost the cost of plated, especially if you buy by the thousand.

                    https://www.precisiondelta.com/products/bullets/9mm/

                    Yeah those cheap white box Winchesters also disappeared and price jumped in The Great Ammo Shortage of 2013/2014.
                    If it weren't for double standards, liberals would have no standards at all.

                    "Ammo and really good friends are hard to find in a gunfight so I bring them with me" E. J. Owens

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                    • #11
                      in handguns I shoot mostly cast ,have a lot of various alloys of lead, several moulds, lube, sizers, powder, primers.but when I can buy cheap ammo and cast bullets,I save what I have.
                      I was raised in the 50\'s on jackrabbits and gunpowder.salt and pepper wooda made\'em taste better

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                      • #12
                        Hand loading is a hobby for me, from day one it wasn't about the economics but rather about the quality and consistency I can achieve with my own loads. Now if I were a super high volume shooter, I'd probably approach it differently, but I'd still be loading my own verses buying factory.

                        As far as firearms, a good reliable self defense handgun is one I plan on carrying and shooting regularly in order to maintain proficiency. It also must hold up to my regular shooting sessions of 100 or so rounds per. OTOH, a range gun may not serve well as a carry gun, it can, but it may be too heavy or bulky due to it's design to handle a lot higher round count before things start wearing or breaking.

                        BTW, my son bought a Shield a year or so back and loves it. But he also just recently bought a Sig P320 and is super happy with that as well. I personally like the Shield for it's slim features and how it sits in my small hands.

                        Congrats on your purchase.

                        HBC

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by TMan51 View Post
                          Well, I have a ton of once fired 9mm pickup brass, and though I sold what I thought would be my last 9mm pistol a few years back, it made sense that the availability of brass, free brass, would justify such an acquisition. After all, I could keep shooting costs down by reloading, right?
                          I had reloaded some 9mmP brass which were picked up. Big problem with decapping pins on older RCBS resizing die. There were about 15 cases of which the flash holes were totally undersized. This resulted in the decapping pins getting stuck in the case and I had to take out the shell holder and the stuck case to remove the decapping pin. This now made me to understand why RCBS and other Reloading Companies has moved to headed decapping pins. This prevent the decapping pin from getting stuck inside the flash hole. I thing I am just going to change the decapping rod and then it would be fine in future.

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                          • #14
                            Yeah, I had that issue with RCBS and when that happened with LEE dies, I'd have to loosen the nut on top, and drop the shaft back down the collet.
                            I now use the dillon decap/resize die on my 550b, and it's spring loaded, and has never done that to me ever.
                            Now if that happens I hear a *crunch* sprooing, then I grab the case in station 1 and pitch it.
                            Originally posted by Reloader270 View Post

                            I had reloaded some 9mmP brass which were picked up. Big problem with decapping pins on older RCBS resizing die. There were about 15 cases of which the flash holes were totally undersized. This resulted in the decapping pins getting stuck in the case and I had to take out the shell holder and the stuck case to remove the decapping pin. This now made me to understand why RCBS and other Reloading Companies has moved to headed decapping pins. This prevent the decapping pin from getting stuck inside the flash hole. I thing I am just going to change the decapping rod and then it would be fine in future.
                            I\'m not just a gun, I\'m YOUR gun. (Hold me!)

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                            • #15
                              I too have found it almost as cheap to buy 9mm as it is to reload. So I just buy both, while they are still cheap. If you buy in bulk, you can catch $7 box with free shipping, when you buy 1000.

                              I still remember the last shortage, so I am stocking up both factory bullets, and components to reload while they are still "dirt cheap".

                              For 223, I can still reload for at least 10 cents cheaper per round, but I still buy both components and factory loads for same reason as 9mm.

                              The rest of my brass I either collect from range floor, or buy spent brass from range for $20-$30 per 1000. Again just to stock up on it while cheap.

                              Just because it is cheaper now, does not necessarily mean it will be that way, this time next year. Without getting too political, the dems have taken the house, and Oregon has introduced a state bill to limit ammo purchases to <50 bullets a month. Tells me things are more likely to get more restrictive rather than less

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