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  • Primers

    Ok, so there are so many primmers out there, I have been doing a lot of research, and primmers are made with mostly the same ingredients. Each company may add a little something or more of one ingredient, then another. I have been trying to find information on if one is hotter than another. I have found very little.

    So my question is, is there a way of matching primmers to certain calibers, or powders, or is it just a good guessing game. I know my AR likes Remington 7.5 but the manual calls for cci. Just wondering if anyone else has thought of this.
    All it takes to allow evil to continue is for one good man to do nothing.

    Rangers lead the way!
    SUA SPONTE

  • #2
    After much searching these two documents are as close to a burn-rate comparison as I've been able to uncover.
    To my knowledge there has been no scientific type study of how one brand of primer may compare to the next.
    In this matter we hand loaders are simply left with those tried and true instructions, "wash rinse repeat".

    GC
    Most evil men will not be persuaded to the path of righteousness by propaganda or by legislation; however, they can certainly be corrected by good men with rifles.
    - Lt. Colonel John Dean Cooper: (paraphrased)

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    • #3
      Here is a link to some interesting Large Rifle and Large Pistol data. This was a homemade experiment to evaluate primer "strength". I don't know how this strength relates to ignition. Can a flame be smaller and yet hotter? Perhaps this generates more questions than answers. But I certainly applaud the authors efforts and ingenuity. RD

      http://castingstuff.com/primer_testing_reference.htm

      BTW, Clicking on the photos will enlarge them. I'm impressed by his abilities.


      You might also check here for a visual idea of primer variation.

      http://www.6mmbr.com/PrimerPix.html
      Last edited by Rockydog; 1 week ago.
      Every once in a while in life we need a policeman, a lawyer, a doctor and a preacher. We need a farmer three times a day, every day.

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      • #4
        Began loading black powder and later graduated to smokeless. Winchester and Remington were the most used and available well over half a century ago. Then, as now, I use what's available. In my world primers are primers. However.....

        A few years back during "The Great Hoarding Epidemic" where a false panic caused the shelves to become void of components, all I could find were crap primers from S&B. Horrible stuff... So today, I buy a brick of primers now and then. Excluding the crappy ones, its still whatever is available. CCI, Win, Rem, Fed or such. I'm not that picky. Only thing I do is cut back a bit on powder with magnum primers. Other than that, I worry about primers about as much as what I fix for breakfast. With either, it's whatever's available.
        A tee shirt read:
        The U.S. Army.
        Because even Marines need heroes.

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        • #5
          Looks like I'll try to avoid buying Remington from now on even tho in the flash test they were brighter.
          Last edited by daboone; 1 week ago.
          Good judgement comes from experience,
          and a lot of that comes from bad judgement.
          Mark Twain

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          • #6
            Originally posted by daboone View Post
            Looks like I'll try to avoid buying Remington from now on even tho in the flash test they were brighter.
            I don't use them myself, just curious. Are you avoiding them because they're lower power?

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            • #7
              I don't spend a lot of time on primer research. For larger cases with slower powders all of the manufacturers offer magnum primers. I'm more concerned with local availability than the brisance of primers. The hardness of the cup is a more useful characteristic for my applications. Bolt guns for hunting get Federal LR. AR gets CCI SR. Pistols get CCI SP. Shotguns get Winchester 209.
              If it weren't for double standards, liberals would have no standards at all.

              "Ammo and really good friends are hard to find in a gunfight so I bring them with me" E. J. Owens

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              • #8
                The Rem 7-1/2's were popular years ago. I still buy them when I catch them on a deal. I have around 1,200 of them in the cabinet right now and am not shy about using them. I have not noticed early throat erosion from using them but they tend to produce pretty inconsistent velocities. I will see variations in the 20+ fps on a 5 shot string, where the same load using a BR4 will see >10, although the max velocity using the BR4 is always lower. Bottom for me is the Rem's work, they are just going to produce a little larger group on most days.
                Friends don't let friends shoot factory ammo.

                Continuous effort - not strength or intelligence - is the key to unlocking our potential.
                -Winston Churchill

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                • #9
                  Rockydog, very interesting, they seem to burn differently, but is it enough to make a lot of difference. If the heat from one said primers was hotter than another, it seems to me it could make a small difference.
                  Thanks for finding and posting that, like I said earlier very interesting.
                  ​​​​​​
                  ​​​​
                  All it takes to allow evil to continue is for one good man to do nothing.

                  Rangers lead the way!
                  SUA SPONTE

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                  • #10
                    Their flash was brighter but their SD was significant. compared to all the others.
                    Good judgement comes from experience,
                    and a lot of that comes from bad judgement.
                    Mark Twain

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                    • #11
                      For my rifles that I use strictly for punching paper, I try to find the CCI or Remington BR . For my milsurps without scopes and where I'm not looking for sub MOA groups I use whatever I can find. I'm not sure whether the bench rest primers are really any better than standard though as I have shot lots of 1/4" groups out of my 308 using Winchester standard large rifle primers.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Scottbird40 View Post
                        Rockydog, very interesting, they seem to burn differently, but is it enough to make a lot of difference. If the heat from one said primers was hotter than another, it seems to me it could make a small difference.
                        Thanks for finding and posting that, like I said earlier very interesting.
                        ​​​​​​
                        ​​​​
                        Might be good to use the hotter ones in winter if using ball powders to help with ignition, but I have never been able to tell any different. If I was running them over a chronograph probably, but not just by going out and shooting.

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                        • #13
                          I don't give a thought to which primer is hotter than the other. All I care about is how they work in tht particular rifle and load combination.
                          I normally go with BR primers mainly with CCI. My 6.5 CM Savage cannot consistently set off CCI BR so I switched to Fed Gold Medal primers.
                          If the rifle/load combination works good I will stick with it if not after everything does not work I will switch primers.
                          Don't overthink it.
                          "The United States Marine Corps is a drug and I am a recovering addict."

                          "American by birthright… U.S. MARINE by the Grace of GOD!"

                          "And on the 8th day God created Marines and like fish, we came from the sea!"

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                          • #14
                            With black powder and substitutes people wanted hotter and hotter caps. With the advent of the 209 shotgun primer conversion the same hotter must be better thought process was. continued. When Blackhorn209 powder came out it was found that the "magnum" primers actually moved the charge column and bullet forward before ignition causing a pressure spike and poor groups.

                            I only have a few loads that are primer specific. A few target loads and a most of my subsonics.
                            Endeavor to persevere.

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                            • #15
                              Yet another good article on primer performance...

                              My takeaway on this fine effort by Mr. Holland is that very detailed record keeping is paramount! Further, when you discover a load that works well, reserve as large a supply of those specific components for that one load as you are able! Because changing anything, inclusive of lot numbers of powder, primers, cases and bullets will mandate starting load development about from the beginning, in order to find that sweet spot again!

                              Most shooters and handloaders know that the primer plays a vital role. For a start, should it fail, the firearm doesn’t work – period - with potentially disastrous consequences for some users and inconvenience for many. As bad if not worse - as it’s a potentially very dangerous occurrence - is a partial or delayed…
                              Most evil men will not be persuaded to the path of righteousness by propaganda or by legislation; however, they can certainly be corrected by good men with rifles.
                              - Lt. Colonel John Dean Cooper: (paraphrased)

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