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Model 1917 Eddystone

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  • Model 1917 Eddystone

    I have come by an Eddystone US Military Model 1917 Rifle (.30-06). It's in very good shape. Barrel stamp "JA" for Johnson Automatics indicates the barrel has been replaced, and barrel looks fine. Any reason this rifle would need light loads? I have a bunch of rounds I loaded for hunting -- 56 gr of 4350 with 165 gr bullets -- and I'd just as soon shoot them through it as make up a special batch.

    Also -- can anyone help me track this rifle down in the Standard Catalog of Firearms? Can't fins it anywhere.

  • #2
    Your serial number on the receiver will tell the story and so will a competent gunsmith.
    Jeremy

    "Necessity is the mother of all inventions."

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    • #3
      You can probably find more info under P14 Enfield. the rifle was designed by the British and orininally made in 303 Brit. Winchester/Remington and Eddystone Arsenal ( a subsidiary of Remington) Made them. when the USA entered WW-1 they needed rifles, and the tooling was in the USA sothey converter the P14 design to '06 cartridge.

      They were known to be very strong actions...and VERY long actions. They sold cheap as surplus and many people bought them just for the action to make magnum sporting rifles. I've shot them in 300 H&H Improved, 458 win Mag and one in 460 Weatherby.

      Known for the dog-leg bolt and the perch belly mag/stock extending down.

      Always best to have a 'good; smith check the rifle before firing a older gun

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      • #4
        The 1917s are indeed hell for stout rifles. As yours is rebarreled, it might ot be an issue, but every Eddystone M1917 I've checked with the original barrel runs a little on the long side when it comes to headspace. Many will close on a no-go gauge, but won't close on a field gauge. Just need to adjust sizing die properly when reloading, and not a problem.If you adjust to minimum, case life is kinda short.
        I currently have 2 Eddystones, one a sporter frm back in the 50s, and one all original.
        "The fact that guns can kill another human being is the whole point. That\'s why they are so darn good at deterring violent criminals". Ann Coulter

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        • #5
          Your rifle was likely re-barreled for use in WWII and sold to the allies for the Lend Lease act. The stamping on the barrel indicates that.

          Like Charley just said check out the headspace with a set of Go/NO GO gauges and lastly a field gauge or take it to a reputable gun smith to get it checked out.

          Jeremy

          "Necessity is the mother of all inventions."

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          • #6
            i lugged one of them over many hill sides and through a bunch of draws back in the 80's.
            i was a happy, happy camper when i bought that lightweight stainless Ruger in 308 and put a scope on it.
            i shoot cast bullets through my 1917 now, but it wouldn't break it to shoot any sane jacketed loads down the barrel.

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            • #7
              I had one several years ago, still have the bruises to show from it (albeit a pic). IIRC there were some that had cracked receiver issues, I can't recall if it was a particular heat treat from one specific manuf. or if it was an over-tightened re-barrel job at a specific arsenal. I would have it checked by a competent gunsmith.
              That's my opinion and I'm stick'n to it...
              ...till I change my mind.

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              • #8
                From what I recall, it was rebarreling that was involved in the M1917 problems. Some early 1903s were heat treating problems.
                "The fact that guns can kill another human being is the whole point. That\'s why they are so darn good at deterring violent criminals". Ann Coulter

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                • #9
                  A quick history of the Small Arms of WWI Primer 028: U.S. Rifle Model of 1917. A wealth of information and well worth the 23 minutes you'll invest watching this presentation by C&Rsenal...
                   
                  Most evil men will not be persuaded to the path of righteousness by propaganda or by legislation; however, they can certainly be corrected by good men with rifles.
                  - Lt. Colonel John Dean Cooper: (paraphrased)

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                  • #10
                    Pretty neat video.
                    I have a brand new bayonet from that era and the video helped me identify it as for the 1917. A friend of mine gave it to me.
                    Don't believe it has ever been put on a rifle, only marks are from taking it out and putting back into scabbard.
                    Thanks for the video.
                    "The United States Marine Corps is a drug and I am a recovering addict."

                    "American by birthright… U.S. MARINE by the Grace of GOD!"

                    "And on the 8th day God created Marines and like fish, we came from the sea!"

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                    • #11
                      When Roy Weatherby invented the modern magnum cartridges he used the 1917 action because it is sooo long. Years later he upgraded to the German made Mark V. While the Mark V has been made in USA, Japan, and Germany, IF you look closely on a new Weatheryby Mark V, the same rotation safe of the Enfield 1917 is used.

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                      • #12
                        If you, like I do, really enjoy the old guns, then you should check out the many offerings by CandRsenal. The gentlemen is doing some extraordinarily fine work in documenting the guns of WWI.

                        Look them up on Bit Chute dot com (Cant seem to get the link to work properly)
                        Or Full30.com and youtube.

                        https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=candrsenal

                        As well as their own website...
                        Last edited by Guncrank; 1 day ago.
                        Most evil men will not be persuaded to the path of righteousness by propaganda or by legislation; however, they can certainly be corrected by good men with rifles.
                        - Lt. Colonel John Dean Cooper: (paraphrased)

                        Comment

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