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  • #31
    CCI markets 2 primers as "Mil-Spec" Jammer, There is, as far as my searching has found, nothing "special" about them except they are the CCI Magnum primers that they now call "mil-spec".

    #41 is the small "mil-spec" CCI, #34 is the large. Both are rifle primers, essentially being marketed to AR owners and milsurp owners.

    https://www.midwayusa.com/product/13...ary-primers-41

    https://www.midwayusa.com/product/13...ary-primers-34


    Both my 1911's just kick the snot out of the primers, but then original 19-pound mainsprings will do that, just as Saint John intended.

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    • #32
      I don't think I want to deal with the issues that would cascade from a heavier mainspring.

      I've only built one 1911-- I took one of Bob Rodger's classes, and I haven't tested it with Winchester primers. By the time I took that class I'd already stopped using Winchester primers. It's quite possible it would do better with the harder primers, I used to compete with the mil spec pistols I have, and they've had literally tens of thousands of rounds through them. They were also the first weapons I bought when I started shooting again, and it's very possible that the mainsprings are starting to wear. How long does a mainspring last?

      One of the main reasons I reload is I want to fit the ammo to each weapon, not change the weapons to fit the ammo. There's a balance there between changing a spring that's worn out and changing a spring to try to improve performance.
      There is no chance I will re-join the NRA as long as Ted Nugent is on the board of directors.

      I'm proud to live in a Sanctuary City! We welcome all immigrants and refugees!

      Black lives matter.

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      • #33
        OP, Jammer. you may already know about these, if not,,
        Gas guns (ARs) are hard on brass, but the situation can be improved.
        1) Velcro stuck on the case deflector will lessen dings from cases that slap the deflector on harsh ejections.
        2) the extractor claw ears may dig into the rims and cause ejection problems plus mess up the rims.
        if that is happening, round the sharp extractor claw ears with fine sand paper carefully until it stops, but no more.
        3) the barrel extension lugs are usually sharp and leave a couple scar lines on the necks.
        if so, those offending lugs need to be smoothed.

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        • #34
          Originally posted by Jammer Six View Post
          I don't think I want to deal with the issues that would cascade from a heavier mainspring.

          I've only built one 1911-- I took one of Bob Rodger's classes, and I haven't tested it with Winchester primers. By the time I took that class I'd already stopped using Winchester primers. It's quite possible it would do better with the harder primers, I used to compete with the mil spec pistols I have, and they've had literally tens of thousands of rounds through them. They were also the first weapons I bought when I started shooting again, and it's very possible that the mainsprings are starting to wear. How long does a mainspring last?

          One of the main reasons I reload is I want to fit the ammo to each weapon, not change the weapons to fit the ammo. There's a balance there between changing a spring that's worn out and changing a spring to try to improve performance.
          Mainsprings last a heck of a lot longer than recoil springs do. Both my 1911's have their original mainsprings, Their original recoil springs, are LONG gone, and so is one's first replacement (and probably second replacement, don't remember) recoil spring.
          Who knows,, both those probably OUGHT TO BE replaced, as much as they have been shot and especially as much as they have been (and still get) carried Condition 1. Hammer cocked, mainspring fully loaded, for months at a time.
          Having noted this (I am guilty of not thinking of it), I will likely replace them both this winter at some point. They will be Wolff springs.

          I do not consider replacing "stock" springs with stock-strength springs to be any manner of "performance improver", yet replacing a worn, tired, spring with a stock replacement is usually exactly that.
          My Auto-5 is wearing it's 4th replacement recoil spring, only it's 2nd bolt closure (action) spring.
          That is simply "maintenance".
          People all over the internet have cycling issues with this absolutely reliable old shotgun (including her Remington, Savage, and European sisters), until they replace 50, 70, 90+ year old springs (recoil and action) with new ones, then they suddenly run like Swiss watches. They also suddenly kick a whole lot less too.

          Now, as far as "improving performance" goes, and the 1911, every 1911 and "45" book I have states that the stock 16-pound force recoil spring is perfectly fine for the use the gun was designed for, being carried a lot and shot a little by the Army.
          108 years of experience has shown that when you subject one to competition shooting, shooting 10's upon 10's of thousands of rounds of "standard" ammo, the slide pretty soon cracks the frame from bashing/slamming together.
          Yes, the 1911 survived 6,000 rounds, plus "bad ammo testing" with no damage, but when you wade into a couple hundred rounds a week, week after week, that's 10,000 rounds a year, and it is not the least bit difficult to do this for multiple years.
          My IDPA-running 1911's wear 22-pound recoil springs. They also wear a polyurethane rubber 'bumper' at the base of the spring for the slide to slam into.
          My IDPA-run EAA Witness Compact Polymer wear a heavier-than-stock recoil spring too.
          These are the same .45's I concealed carry.
          I have been unable to find a "+P" replacement for my Star B Super, so it wears stock springs, but 9mmP isn't .45 Auto horsepower.

          There are some portions of "improving performance" that I have no real "issues" with, others, I see no value is screwing with them. The above 1911's wear 4-finger flat springs in place of the "stock" 3-finger models, the above guns firing pin return springs are stock as are firing pins.
          I myself do not venture far from the 2nd Gospel of Saint John Moses Browning:
          2 And shouldst thou muck with it, and hang all manner
          of foul implements upon it, and profane its internal
          parts, thou shalt surely have malfunctions, and in the
          midst of battle thou shalt surely come to harm.
          I do not tolerate malfunctions, I try very hard to not be the cause of them by "mucking with it" or "profaning it's internals".

          On the opposite side of that 16# recoil spring is the people who want to shoot Mouse Fart low-power ammo for bullseye shooting, AND they want the gun to cycle ammo it was never designed to cycle (and thus they profane it's internals mightily). These are the people for whom 14 pound and I believe 12 pound springs are offered for, so they can shoot ammo the "stock" 1911 thinks is a squib.
          These folks do not shoot full-power ammo, they often want to make trigger pull lighter too.
          The 1911 it is difficult with the original parts, to get a trigger pull down below 3 1/2 pounds and not have the gun go cyclic from the hammer bouncing off the sear (more correctly the sear bouncing off the hammer) when the slide slams closed.
          The same spring that holds the sear against the hammer ALSO pushes the disconnector up to re-activate the gun.
          People who want very light target gun triggers are forced to reduce mainspring power as well as fiddle with the "finger-spring" under the back of the grip that operates the grip safety, trigger, sear, and disconnector.
          When they wade into lightening mainspring power, usually they have to ALSO balance this with a lighter firing pin return spring (or they get misfires).

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