Announcement

Collapse

New Chat Room

The new chat room is floating on the bottom right hand corner of your screen. You will have to login to chat. But don't forget to log out when you are done, otherwise it will keep you listed as active.
See more
See less

Salt Bath Annealing

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Salt Bath Annealing

    The other day I was on my second favorite forum, snipershide and a fellow shared this link:

    http://www.65creedmoor.com/index.php?topic=6019.0

    It's from the 6.5creedmoor.com site and discusses using a salt bath as the heat source for annealing. Until I read it, I'd never heard of such an approach, but I find it quite fascinating. Perhaps some if you guys have tried this? Let the discussion begin...

  • #2
    Looks like it might be a good idea, but some questions, and possible drawbacks. How corrosive is that salt bath? I doubt the Lee pot will last a long time used for that purpose. What is the volatilization temperature of the salt solution? If low enough everything around his work area will be showing signs of corrosion fairly quickly. He's already made a mistake in mentioning lead volatilization, says it is close to the melting point, inhalation hazard, etc. Melting point of lead is 622F, volatilization/vaporization point is almost 3200F. I'd want some more data and answers before I used the method.
    "The fact that guns can kill another human being is the whole point. That\'s why they are so darn good at deterring violent criminals". Ann Coulter

    Comment


    • #3
      I've never considered using solutions for annealing, but I've certainly thought about whether it's feasibly possible.

      If I even understand this, and I'm not sure I do, I'd first be concerned that the solution could deplete metallurgic integrity beyond the exposed region. Kind of like what happens when annealing too long with a torch, the heat spreads to the case head, thus, making it too soft to safely use. Wouldn't this be a problem with solution annealing as well?

      I like the sound of the concept, but I'd need to hear more about it from those who use it. I'd want to know if it poses any risk to firearms, die's and other tooling through brass exposure, could it alter the metallurgy of the jacket on a bullet, and could it alter or affect the powder or primers?

      I think for the time being I stick to torch annealing, it's worked very well for myself and other reloaders for many years.

      Comment


      • #4
        OK, so I'll bite. Like dadajack said, why not just use lead? When you cast a run of bullets or ingots, why not run a batch of cases thru, too?
        Hold them with a pair of pliers or a leather glove or make a holder that holds a couple at a time.and dip them for about 6 seconds.
        Wimachtendienk, Wingolauchsik, Witahemui

        He who knows not and knows not that he knows not, is a fool.
        He who knows not and knows he knows not is wise.

        Comment


        • #5
          I am befused and confuddled. Methinks a salt bath is NOT a solution, but a bed of salt grains heated to the "right" temp for annealing. Why do I think this? Because a salt water solution will NEVER reach a high enough temp to anneal anything 'cause the water would boil off.

          The use of salts is a time honored way to heat things up for various soft shaping of more or less brittle materials. So far as the corrosive effects go, I can't speak too loudly, but it seems to me that a post anneal water bath would not be out of line. At the temps I'd expect for annealing, there should be no chemical reactions with the brass.
          -Remote locations are cheap insurance.
          -There are two kinds of ships: Submarines and targets

          Comment


          • #6
            Not a salt water bath, just melted salts (NOT "salt", sodium chloride) but sodium nitrite and another salt whose name I forgot since I read the article. Most salts are pretty corrosive to ferrous metals, but not to the brass alloys used. No worries there. Just corrosive to everything made of iron or steel alloy around your work area.
            "The fact that guns can kill another human being is the whole point. That\'s why they are so darn good at deterring violent criminals". Ann Coulter

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Charley View Post
              Not a salt water bath, just melted salts (NOT "salt", sodium chloride) but sodium nitrite and another salt whose name I forgot since I read the article. Most salts are pretty corrosive to ferrous metals, but not to the brass alloys used. No worries there. Just corrosive to everything made of iron or steel alloy around your work area.
              OK, now it's getting me less confused. Sodium nitrite melts at about 520F, so if that's the "right" temp to anneal any particular brass alloy, it'll work. If there is another salt mixed in, the melt will be at a different temp, and without knowing which and how much of the other is in the pot, we can't know what the temp is. Two things, then:
              One needs a way to keep the head out of the soup, otherwise the whole shell gets the treatment, and that may not be quite so good. Temp sticks remain a needed tool.
              Sodium nitrite is VERY hygroscopic. It will soak up water from the atmosphere, so when you fire up the pot, watch for popping just like water in your lead melter.

              Unless, uv cuss, I'm still confused, just at a higher level.
              -Remote locations are cheap insurance.
              -There are two kinds of ships: Submarines and targets

              Comment


              • #8
                I looked into this months ago. It looks like it should be very consistent if you take to time to build stoppers for your different brass so they get anneal at the neck, and if you keep the salt level correct. The salt consumption seems minimal, so mostly a stand problem. Some report very good results.

                Where I bailed was the explosion factor. I clean most brass in either sonic or pin, but always wet. I never anneal if the brass is "wet" but I am certain that from time to time I have some drops of water hanging out, especially by the primer pocket. I read water in a pot of melted salt it likely going to blow back, so no thanks. I also read, although seemingly less clear, that the fumes are toxic if the salt is overheated. May be FUD, but I was not willing to risk it. Pletty of other ways to get it done.
                Continuous effort - not strength or intelligence - is the key to unlocking our potential.
                -Winston Churchill

                Comment


                • #9
                  I use an Annealease. I've had the same bottle all season, and they come out perfectly cooked. For me this is a solution that carries more problems that I don't have at all right now. I anneal as soon as they come out of the pin tumbler, so the annealing actually makes them dry faster.

                  That said, I see no reason why it wouldn't be just as good for the brass itself. Using a machine and a torch, whether you DIY or buy one, just seems like a lot less hassle, and once you set it correctly there's no monitoring it. It'll run a hundred cases in a few minutes while you're doing other tasks. Turn it off, turn the flame off and you're done. Light the torch, flip a switch and it's ready to go for that case again.

                  That system just looks like a lot more hassle for the same result. Once the salts are cool do they recrystallize and can be reused? If so, it's probably ultimately cheaper, but that's the only advantage I see, and that comes with a lot of hassle.
                  “Of all tyrannies, a tyranny sincerely exercised for the good of its victims may be the most oppressive." C.S. Lewis

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Here is a you tube video detailing this process. https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_c...&v=vwdTaDLz56Q Carefully consider the warnings between 1:30 and 2:35 on the video. It's enough to make one consider whether this is a good idea or not.

                    Interestingly, on a salt heat treating site they recommended that any tools used in the process have solid steel rod handles as tubing could cause eruptions when submerged due to gas expansion in the tube. Based on that, I'd damn sure not want to anneal cases that were not deprimed. RD
                    Last edited by Rockydog; 6 days ago.
                    Every once in a while in life we need a policeman, a lawyer, a doctor and a preacher. We need a farmer three times a day, every day.

                    Comment

                    Working...
                    X