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Possibility to combine two Lyman products for better accuracy and reduce setup time

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  • Possibility to combine two Lyman products for better accuracy and reduce setup time

    I'm sitting here in my hotel room in Yuma, AZ while deployed down to the SW border thinking about which brass cutter to get. Since I'm currently working the swing shift, I've got plenty of time to read reviews and look up prices on all the different models and options. I'm just starting out with this reloading thing so I'm not wanting to buy the absolute best (most expensive) options. I was pretty interested in the LE Wilson brass cutter but after looking at what makes it so great (the micrometer adjustment) and the cost of everything you need, I don't think I want to go that route right now as it would be over $200 just to start trimming 223 rounds.

    So I started looking at the Lyman and Lee products. I found great reviews and like the affordability of the Lyman universal case trimmer. Not having to have a whole set of shell holders seems like a great benefit and the consistency seems pretty good. Then I found the Lee cutter and lock head coupled with the case gauges really interesting due to the set size of the gauges providing what would have to be near perfect consistency. Low and behold, Lyman has something similar for a handheld option.

    As I studied the Lyman E-zee trim (EZT), it dawned on me that there might be a way to use the rifle and pistol pilots from the EZT with the Lyman Universal case trimmer (UCT). I realize it seems redundant, given that the UCT has a locking nut to set your cutting depth, but it almost seems like this would be better to leave the locking nuts set for max depth and use the pilots from the EXT to control your cutting depth. Now, one problem I possibly see is that the UCT has a round ball detent that I assume sets into the primer pocket of your brass on the captured end. The round surface might effect the cutting depth the gauges provide. Does that make sense to anybody else? Is there another reason I shouldn't consider this? I guess the main benefit I was thinking this would provide is eliminating setup time by not having to cut, measure repeat when setting up to cut different calibers. I think there might be some better consistency with the gauges, but from what I've read the UCT is pretty accurate and consistent once you've got it setup.

    Thoughts?

  • #2
    I chuck Lee's pilot/gauge and cutter in cordless drill and hand hold the case holder . Otherwise I have a Hornady case trimmer for cartridge's that Lee doesn't make a gauge for . And if I have a lot of them to do I will chuck that up to the drill also . I haven't used Lymans version of Lee's system because I already have Lee's but that system is about as consistent as you can get . Lee will make custom trim gauge's too . I only had them make one for my 6mmAR ( 6mm Grendel ) I just like to keep things simple as possible ,less things to go wrong.

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    • #3
      Deployed to the SW border as in Border Patrol or ARNG?
      Friends don't let friends shoot factory ammo.

      Continuous effort - not strength or intelligence - is the key to unlocking our potential.
      -Winston Churchill

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      • #4
        Get the Wilson and cry only once.
        "The United States Marine Corps is a drug and I am a recovering addict."

        "American by birthright… U.S. MARINE by the Grace of GOD!"

        "And on the 8th day God created Marines and like fish, we came from the sea!"

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        • #5
          Originally posted by golong View Post
          Deployed to the SW border as in Border Patrol or ARNG?
          Neither actually. The sheer amount of agencies here is staggering; I am with Coast Guard Investigative Service.

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          • #6
            Well, that works as well. If you want, PM me your address and I will send you an RCBS trimmer with all the pilots and case holders. It's from the early '90's but has hardly any use. Should serve your needs until you decide to get more serious about reloading.

            As a side note, you won't need to trim pistol brass, just the rifle stuff.
            Friends don't let friends shoot factory ammo.

            Continuous effort - not strength or intelligence - is the key to unlocking our potential.
            -Winston Churchill

            Comment


            • #7
              The big question is how many calibers are you loading for and how many rounds will you do a year? I use the lee trimmers on at least a dozen different cartridges. I get by just fine with them.

              I did buy a Worlds Finest Trimmer for .223. It works in any drill but does not chamfer. Very fast system form the trimming standpoint. The Giraud works similarly but does inside and outside chamfer.
              Every once in a while in life we need a policeman, a lawyer, a doctor and a preacher. We need a farmer three times a day, every day.

              Et Canis Manducare Canis Mundi

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              • #8
                I use the Lee's for 95% of the trimming I do. No need to worry about adjustment, I just chuck the length gauge and cutter in my drill press, and can trim a BUNCH of cases in a fairly short time. I do use an older RCBS trimmer for oddball stuff.
                "The fact that guns can kill another human being is the whole point. That\'s why they are so darn good at deterring violent criminals". Ann Coulter

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by golong View Post
                  Well, that works as well. If you want, PM me your address and I will send you an RCBS trimmer with all the pilots and case holders. It's from the early '90's but has hardly any use. Should serve your needs until you decide to get more serious about reloading.

                  As a side note, you won't need to trim pistol brass, just the rifle stuff.
                  WOW!!! That is extremely nice and generous of you Golong. I sincerely appreciate it and I've sent you my address. Thanks for helping me learn how to reload.

                  Chris

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Rockydog View Post
                    The big question is how many calibers are you loading for and how many rounds will you do a year? I use the lee trimmers on at least a dozen different cartridges. I get by just fine with them.

                    I did buy a Worlds Finest Trimmer for .223. It works in any drill but does not chamfer. Very fast system form the trimming standpoint. The Giraud works similarly but does inside and outside chamfer.
                    For rifle, I'm planning on reloading 223, 30-06, and 30-30. I might also load some 6.5 Creedmore and a couple others. My dad and I have been working on a pretty sizeable firearm collection for many years and I'd love reload every caliber we've got (eventually).

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Charley View Post
                      I use the Lee's for 95% of the trimming I do. No need to worry about adjustment, I just chuck the length gauge and cutter in my drill press, and can trim a BUNCH of cases in a fairly short time. I do use an older RCBS trimmer for oddball stuff.
                      I really like the design of the Lee's and the price is darn near unbeatable. I really think there's some good logic in using those gauges and having them act as a mechanical stop for trimming brass. I do a lot of woodworking in my spare time and if I have lots of cuts to make of a specific size, I always set up a mechanical stop to ensure uniformity of the cuts.

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                      • #12
                        I do as well.
                        "The fact that guns can kill another human being is the whole point. That\'s why they are so darn good at deterring violent criminals". Ann Coulter

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                        • #13
                          the micrometer on the L E Wilson trimmer is just icing on the cake, not necessary to get the perfect cuts this lathe can produce. I use case gages to set this trimmer. I've seen them on ebay for $30 without all the bells and whistles. The shell holders are perfect finger savers when doing primer pockets.
                          Good judgement comes from experience,
                          and a lot of that comes from bad judgement.
                          Mark Twain

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by daboone View Post
                            the micrometer on the L E Wilson trimmer is just icing on the cake, not necessary to get the perfect cuts this lathe can produce. I use case gages to set this trimmer. I've seen them on ebay for $30 without all the bells and whistles. The shell holders are perfect finger savers when doing primer pockets.
                            I think the 'Sinclair' micrometer (which is what mine has) is more of a negative than a positive. It takes some fussing with to zero it not if, but when you loosen the set screw too much. Also, it has a tendency to cant just a bit if you tighten it too much. When I switched to Wilson dies I went with their micrometer instead of the Sinclair's. Much better.
                            Friends don't let friends shoot factory ammo.

                            Continuous effort - not strength or intelligence - is the key to unlocking our potential.
                            -Winston Churchill

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                            • #15
                              I've been using Lee case trimmers, and more recently the Lyman hand trimmer. But I'm now planning to make an adaptor for the new Lyman case prep center I just purchased to hold the Lee case trimmer, similar to holding it in a drill.
                              The Lord is my shepherd, I shall not want.
                              Welcome to Tennessee, the patron state of shootin' stuff.

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