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Ruger Single 6 with both 22lr and 22 Mag cylinders

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  • Ruger Single 6 with both 22lr and 22 Mag cylinders

    Per my normal, I stopped at the local pawn shop today. Immediately saw a Ruger Single 6 with both cylinders in stainless steel, 6 1/2" configuration. Family and friend's price is $375. I don't have the cash now, but will in a few weeks. Was told not to worry about it as the owner promptly put the pistol in the back away from other eyes.
    "The definition of madness is doing the same thing twice, and expecting a different result." The HIVES

  • #2
    You will love it. I've had one since I was 16. The 22 is fun to shoot bunnies in front of a hound. I never used the 22 mag much but it's nice to have the option.

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    • #3
      My dad has been wanting one of these for as long as I can remember, but never got around to getting one. I sent him a photo and asked what he thought of it. After getting the reaction I was expecting, I told him it would be a late birthday gift for him.
      "The definition of madness is doing the same thing twice, and expecting a different result." The HIVES

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      • #4
        I think I paid $142 back in 1976- Bicentennial model 5 1/2". My first handgun. Still have it. Magnums weren't very accurate and made a lot of noise. Everything else from shorts to Stingers have shot real well. Rarely see them under $400 anymore. You are getting a deal.

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        • #5
          One of my friends in college had one back in the early 80's. I've kind of always wanted one too, but never went actively after one and never stumbled into one. Sadly, the list of guns I've always wanted is much much longer than the list that I have acquired.
          If it weren't for double standards, liberals would have no standards at all.

          "Ammo and really good friends are hard to find in a gunfight so I bring them with me" E. J. Owens

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          • #6
            Still have the one I bought in Wyoming back in the 70s. Blued, 6-1/2 inch bbl with both cylinders, the spare in a little red felt bag that is also still in service. Paid something in the low 70s for it in Rock Springs. A fave plinker, no twig or tin can with the temerity to show itself is safe.
            -Remote locations are cheap insurance.
            -There are two kinds of ships: Submarines and targets

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            • #7
              About 15 miles from home is a hunting area that is shotgun or rimfire only. The area backs up to a bunch of farm field. Explained to dad, we will take out the 22 Mags (I have a Heritage 22 Mag) and go coyote hunting just to test them out.
              "The definition of madness is doing the same thing twice, and expecting a different result." The HIVES

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              • #8
                I have had several of these revolvers. A Ruger and a Colt. They are lacking in several ways.
                The barrels are properly sized for the .22 mag. (.224). They are not very accurate when shooting ,22LR. which needs a .222 barrel.
                .22LR and .22 mag will shoot to a very noticeably different point of impact. Requiring sight adjustments when changing cylinders (calibers)
                Most shooters that own these revolvers don't shoot well enough to tell the difference.
                .22 mag ammo is too expensive to target shoot with for most shooters. Although it is very accurate.
                When I had mine I just shot .22 mag ammo in it.
                If you chronograph .22 mag ammo out of a pistol you will be amazed at the loss of velocity which makes it no more powerful than a .22LR that is shot from a rifle. Although I believe that now they have .22 mag ammo that is designed for a handgun which might do better.
                These issues eliminate the versatility that the buyer believes that he is getting when he purchases one of these pistols.
                Last edited by swampshooter; 3 weeks ago.
                NRA Endowment member
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                NRA classified Master, F-Class mid-range
                Velocity is like a new car, always losing value
                BC is like diamonds, maintaining value forever

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                • #9
                  I cannot agree more. Buying a convertible and expecting equal accuracy out of both cylinders is wishfull thinking. But contrary to predisposed barrel diameter issues my Long rifle cylinder does 1 1/2" at 25 yards while the magnum cylinder does over 3" at best with many types of ammunition tested. Simular to casting bullets. The weight, hardness, or length that works may not be what you expected..

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                  • #10
                    Back in the early 70's my BIL bought one, amazing revolver, very accurate and I just loved the concept. He could really shoot that revolver well, we'd go jack rabbit hunting a lot back then. I've always wanted one, but just seem to not seem to find one when I have the available funds. My son also had one, he bought just a few years back, it had a really, really long target barrel on it, so it was rather easy to discern the accuracy differences with match grade LR ammo.

                    HBC

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                    • #11
                      I have one and its a great revolver. Got it back in the early 90's. Since about 2008 I've only shot 22 Mag out of it. I was given my grandpa's Single Six, an old 3 Screw, after he passed. That one is not convertible. I take both out a couple times a year. Great pieces. One time I purchased Houge ruuber grips for a Ruger Super Blackhawk. In error I purchased the Blackhawk grips. Since they didn't fit my SBH I put them on the Single Six. I also put a Jack Wigands No Drill/Tap scope mount on it and topped it with a red dot sight. Was planning on small game hunting with it. On the public lands around here the small game is pretty much gone thanks to predators and over hunting. I think this winter I will put the original sights back on it.

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                      • #12
                        I take out my Heritage and noticed with 22 Mag, it is pretty much dead on with the sights. With 22lr, it takes a bit to figure out where it hits. I imagine with the Ruger it won't be much of a problem with its adjustable sights. My dad has been wanting a revolver like this as something to shoot with my boys. Top it off, squirrel season is just around the corner. Hope he can take them north for a weekend and put the pistol to good use.
                        "The definition of madness is doing the same thing twice, and expecting a different result." The HIVES

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                        • #13
                          A 1974 blued version was my first handgun, given to me by my Grandfather. I've found it to be a lot of fun. I've been able to consistently hit paper plates as far away as 100 yds with it, although most of the time it's used to blast Gatorade bottles from the 25 yd line. I enjoyed it's qualities so much that I bought a lil Bearcat companion to let my daughters learn handguns when they were first starting out.
                          They may have the clocks, but we have the time...

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                          • #14
                            I also have the Ruger version with the mag cylinder in the sort red sack, that I bought in the late 70s or early 80s. I don't think that I've shot a box of mag shells, but with the LR cylinder its as accurate as I can hold and is fun to shoot.
                            NRA Life Member

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