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  • Shotgun ID

    Gentlemen, I was given a pair of shotguns last week that were discovered in a friend's attic. Both are Stevens single barrel 12 ga. Both date to manufacture between 1886 and 1916. Neither are damascus. Both are missing the forend. I believe, based upon some photos, that one is a Model 107.

    However, the 107 has been destroyed by some moron who has carved/gouged the action and barrel with very deep grooves in some kind of sadistic attempt at decoration. The barrel, even over the chamber, has deep slashes all over it. The barrel has been shortened to 23". It won't even make a wall hanger.

    The other gun isn't in much better shape but would be salvageable. Not financially worth the effort but I like challenges. The biggest challenge is the missing forend. The gun is rusty but not badly pitted. Right now I need help simply to ID it if I want to order the forend irons. The gun is stamped J Stevens Arms & Tools which dates it from 1886 -1916. It is a break open single shot but does not have a top snap. The barrel is full choke and the bore is in good shape. Stock is cracked because it was shot loose.

    I have never seen a gun like this before. You actually pull the trigger back beyond the normal trigger pull to open the gun. If you shoot the gun just keep pulling and the gun drops open. If the hammer is not cocked you pull the trigger back far enough and the gun drops open. (This is a bit dangerous to my thinking. If one was on a trap line and cocked the hammer but got a broken bird, followed by another broken bird and a time out to clear the thrower, it would be very easy to inadvertently pull the trigger as you attempted to open the gun for the time out. Always have to drop the hammer first!)

    The gun has a long top tang inletted into the stock It extends about 4 3/4" from the breech block face. There is also an under tang that is part of the trigger guard. The trigger guard is a heavy cast or machined affair that bolts to the bottom of the breech block. It has a large post on the rear that attaches to the top tang with a screw. The bottom tang actually holds the trigger group, main spring, hammer, trigger return spring, and a link that hooks the trigger to the pin that locks the action.That link is mounted to the front of the trigger.

    The barrel stud for mounting the forend is a simple round stud welded to the barrel with a cup drilled in the back side to accept a spring pin from the forend iron.

    I'll get a pic of the action up later but if any of you has or had a gun of this description I'd like to know the model number. Thanks for reading through this whole thing and for any help that you might be. RD

    Note how the edge of the stock is inletted into the back of the breech block. You can see it at the lower RH corner of the block just above and in front of the trigger. The slot runs all the way up to the square edge.

    Click image for larger version  Name:	IMG_20181215_112845048 (2).jpg Views:	1 Size:	30.1 KB ID:	826875
    Last edited by Rockydog; 12-15-2018, 11:50.
    Every once in a while in life we need a policeman, a lawyer, a doctor and a preacher. We need a farmer three times a day, every day.

    Et Canis Manducare Canis Mundi

  • #2
    As for the other gun, what kind of idiot would think this was a good idea? BTW, that's aluminum paint on the barrel above the forend lug.

    Click image for larger version

Name:	IMG_20181215_113047393 (2).jpg
Views:	4
Size:	28.3 KB
ID:	826877
    Every once in a while in life we need a policeman, a lawyer, a doctor and a preacher. We need a farmer three times a day, every day.

    Et Canis Manducare Canis Mundi

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    • #3
      Ouch...they look bad.

      I guess, I'd just clean the action on the first one, polish it up and just make the action a wall hanger. Because of its unique functioning...would be cool to take of a nail and let visitor fondle.

      On the second one..dah.... guess I'd throw the barrel into the recycling bin, and keep the action for parts!

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      • #4
        You could throw that into the truck tool box and do it a favor.
        I was raised in the 50\'s on jackrabbits and gunpowder.salt and pepper wooda made\'em taste better

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        • #5
          I like the profile of the trigger and the looks of the trigger guard on the one in the second pic. Bet it feels comfortable in the hand.
          Not as Lean, Not as Mean, but still a Marine!

          If there must be trouble, let it be in my day, that my child may have peace. -- Thomas Paine

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          • #6
            Realize in the late 1800's early 1900's you didn't GET "broken birds" at the shooting range,,,, because they used real live pigeons. No 'safety issue' at all.

            Back when people were smarter than guns you didn't need a disconnector on a Model 12.

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            • #7
              Rockydog You ever get a Model # on these?
              Not as Lean, Not as Mean, but still a Marine!

              If there must be trouble, let it be in my day, that my child may have peace. -- Thomas Paine

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              • #8
                Unfortunately I did not. I stripped the one that was all carved up and demilled the action and barrel so that they cannot be used by one of my creative grandsons at some time in the future. It looks similar to a model 85 and model 89 schematics at Numrich but I can't be sure. I can't find a schematic that even comes close to the action of the gun that opens with an extended trigger pull. I've restored guns that looked worse but not by much.
                Every once in a while in life we need a policeman, a lawyer, a doctor and a preacher. We need a farmer three times a day, every day.

                Et Canis Manducare Canis Mundi

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                • #9
                  I'll go out and say Iver Johnson, they made a lot of single shots back in the day. And just the profile on the action, brings to mind.
                  Mtman714; A man can do no better then to leave a good garden patch. Thomas Jefferson

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by mtman714 View Post
                    I'll go out and say Iver Johnson, they made a lot of single shots back in the day. And just the profile on the action, brings to mind.
                    myman, I know theses are Stevens guns manufactured between 1886 and 1916 based upon the stampings on the actions. I just need to know the model of the gun in the first post so that I can order a forearm iron. RD
                    Every once in a while in life we need a policeman, a lawyer, a doctor and a preacher. We need a farmer three times a day, every day.

                    Et Canis Manducare Canis Mundi

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      RD-
                      Maybe email Boyd's with the pictures (maybe more) and ask for their assistance?
                      or
                      Richards Microfit USED to have a pretty knowledgeable compliment of employees, has been quite awhile since i have done any business with them.
                      or
                      Savage owns the Stevens name and maybe more? I know the Savage folks are fairly nice and helpful.

                      Best of luck

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                      • #12
                        Most of the Steven models used almost identical wood.

                        Find any model Steven/savage and 'borow' the forened in toto, try it; if it looks like it will work with some fitting, order that model part. If you find one in a gun shop, they would probably let you try it right there; Wisconsin people are friendly!

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                        • #13
                          Bear, I've thought about that, but this barrel has a simple 1/4" round stud 3/8" long with a dimple on the back surface to accept a spring loaded round nosed plunger. Most of the Stevens barrels I see have a heavy steel L shaped lug that is engaged by a flat rectangular plunger. If I can find the iron I can make the wood. Thanks for your help though. RD
                          Every once in a while in life we need a policeman, a lawyer, a doctor and a preacher. We need a farmer three times a day, every day.

                          Et Canis Manducare Canis Mundi

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                          • #14
                            Try Savage Stevens model 94-C. It's the closest I could find in the NRA guide to assembly.
                            Jeremy

                            "Necessity is the mother of all inventions."

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                            • #15
                              Jeremy, Thanks for the try but the first post has the action I'm looking for and it has no top snap. It opens by pulling the trigger past the firing point with the hammer in the uncocked position. The 94C clearly has a top snap. Also the forearm lug is a simple 1/4" post 3/8" long. The 94C has a heavy L shaped forearm lug. Thanks for the help. RD
                              Last edited by Rockydog; 12-25-2018, 23:03.
                              Every once in a while in life we need a policeman, a lawyer, a doctor and a preacher. We need a farmer three times a day, every day.

                              Et Canis Manducare Canis Mundi

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