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  • Squib

    My son and I normally go to the range on Sunday morning. Its about the only time we get to spend together. I'm stuck in the house for a while and couldn.t go. He came by after the range and had a bullet stuck in his judge. My reload. I had loaded some 45's a couple of years ago that came out very light. I thought I had pulled the bullets on all of them. What bothers me is I have no idea why they were light. Been reloading since the late 70's and this is the first squib I've ever had. What bothers me the me the most is I gave my son bad ammunition. He's smart and immediately unloaded and put the gun away. I've always been very careful about my reloading but this really bothers me. I know for certain I'll never give anyone on of my reloads. Something blows up in my face its my problem but hurting one of my sons is unthinkable. Thanks for letting me blow off.
    Never drink down stream from the herd.

  • #2
    That's one of the reasons I am hesitant to give anyone my reloads to shoot. You don't have x-ray vision, and all you can do is damage control to assure future quality. Don't beat yourself up too bad. We are, after all, all human.
    Last edited by JeffG; 1 week ago. Reason: mispelled

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    • #3
      I'll confess to many squibs when I was shooting PPC matches almost every weekend for a couple of years. I was loading 300-800 rounds per session in those days, using an older Dillon with its auto measure feature. Once I no longer needed the volume I was loading at that time I learned the lesson: Don't let the powdering take place out of your sight. Today I use my Dillon as a "two stage" press. Stage One: size, decap, prime, bell. Then I remove the case and put it in a block until I get the number I want for that session. I usually powder pistol rounds from a Li'l Dandy and once finished powdering that block I CHECK EVERY CASE WITH A SMALL LED FLASH LIGHT. Then the cases go back, one by one, into the Dillon for Stage Two: seat, then crimp, most often with a Lee FC die. Done. I can't load 500 rounds an hour that way, more like 200-250 but unlike the Old Days I know every round will perform as intended. It's great not to be in a hurry any more, even though newer Dillons have tackled and solved that problem, I think.

      Not a single squib since I went to the New Way. (BTW, I had become adept at clearing a squib, reloading, and finishing the stage within the time limit. A skill I should not have had to develop.)
      Homo sapiens, [ˈhōmō ˈsāpēənz] Noun. An advanced primate characterized by a large brain which it seldom uses.

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      • #4
        I have had the RCBS Chargemaster 1500 save me, just last weekend. For the precision loads I have a one-by-one operation so it is mostly foolproof. For volume loads I use the CM. In the past I would let the CM fill the pan, go from pan to case, then seat while the next charge was going in to the pan. I changed that operation with the addition of a funnel that did not require me making sure all the powder went in the case so I filled a tray, seated that tray, then went on to the next. At one point I realized the counter on the CM did not match the loads in the trays - it was one short. I went back and weighed all the loads and found one that was 40+ grains light. No way I would have found it had it not been for that counter. From that point on I looked in every case that should have a charge before I charged the next one.

        Be glad you passed on proper operations to your son. All is well. You will adjust to do your best to make sure it does not happen again.
        Friends don't let friends shoot factory ammo.

        Continuous effort - not strength or intelligence - is the key to unlocking our potential.
        -Winston Churchill

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        • #5
          Squibs are no fun, and embarrassing to say the least. But look at it this way: 4 + decades of reloading and you got one squib. Beats the heck out of one double charge...

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          • #6
            55 years of reloading, no squibs!

            Probably because the half million reloads of mine were on a single stage press. If you use a progressive, squibs are going to happen; and one must learn to deal with them...like your son did properly..

            I think Plainsman's 2 Stage press operation is the way to go. Fastest isn't always the best.

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            • #7
              I've had one series of squibs out of one tray of 50, that I was batch-loading on a single stage.

              I was in a bit of a hurry to get enough ammo for an IDPA match, and I skipped the "look them over under the room's central overhead light" because in a lot of years I had never found any "problems" before in that obligatory check of relative powder levels.
              I use voluminous powders where much difference is visible.

              I had, IIRC, 2 or 3 off-notes (weak ones) and 1 honest o by golly primer-only squib.

              That was over a decade ago. I removed that "change" to my procedures.

              I also shifted my pistol ammo to a progressive press, and always on my progressives I have been able to visually check powder level before I put a bullet atop it, so again, that check continues, just in a different format. I can make so much ammo in so short a time I am never In A Hurry.

              I have no problem handing someone else my ammunition, shotgun (where it all started 35+ yrs ago), rifle, or handgun, wife, son, daughters, or anyone else.
              The only handgun ammo that is loaded To The Limit is my SD ammo, and if I am handing you any of my spare, we are both in A Bad Spot.

              There is a certain risk of my rifle ammo not being sized to fit their rifle (because it isn't), but I do not load it for their rifle, it's for my rifles, and fits fine.
              Not an issue of course with the handgun and scattergun stuff.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by BEAR View Post
                55 years of reloading, no squibs!

                Probably because the half million reloads of mine were on a single stage press. If you use a progressive, squibs are going to happen; and one must learn to deal with them...like your son did properly..

                I think Plainsman's 2 Stage press operation is the way to go. Fastest isn't always the best.
                I used a Rock Chucker from the 70's up till 2 years ago when my right shoulder kinda went south. The RCBS couldn't be converted to left hand so I got an RCBS Turret. Never had the slightest desire for a progressive.
                Never drink down stream from the herd.

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                • #9
                  Bought my RCBS single stage in 1967, always thought it was a Rockchucker, seems it is a RC Jr. Don't know if there is much difference, heavy steel.

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                  • #10
                    Visually inspected every case when loading for several local PD's, including my own. 38s and 45s were delivered in 5gl buckets. All were sorted and loaded with a series of single stage presses and EVERY charged case was visually inspected. Almost a decade as a class 6 with 4 PD's and 25 customers requiring exotic or discontinued ammo never issued a single complaint.

                    Did buy a progressive once.... Just once. It broke twice. I repaired it twice. Upon the third break I beat it into rubble and threw it on the curb for trash. I don't trust 'em any more than a pedophile in a children's daycare center.
                    Remember, the last thing a man wants to do is the last thing he does.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Kit Fox View Post
                      I don't trust 'em any more than a pedophile in a children's daycare center.
                      So your saying you really don't like them. Got it.

                      Friends don't let friends shoot factory ammo.

                      Continuous effort - not strength or intelligence - is the key to unlocking our potential.
                      -Winston Churchill

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                      • #12
                        45 years of reloading I've had one squib. It was loaded ok, but powder did not burn, the primer fired and the powder spilled all trough my brothers Blackhawk 44, lodged the bullet in the barrel. Pulled the rest of that batch but could not a reason for failure.

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